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Is Amihan Also Known As Summer Monsoon?

In the Philippines, the Summer Monsoon (West or southwest winds) is called the Habagat (ha-bag-at) and the Winter Monsoon (North or northeast winds) is called the Amihan (a-me-han). The word ‘monsoon’ is believed to originate from the Arabic word mawsim (season), via the Portuguese and then Dutch monsun.

Who is Amihan goddess?

AMIHAN – In Philippine mythology, Amihan is the genderless deity of the wind, depicted as a golden bird. According to the Tagalog folklore, Amihan is the first creature to inhabit the universe, along with Bathala, god of the sky, and Aman Sinaya, goddess of the sea.

What kind of bird is Amihan?

golden eagle


According to folklore, Amihan, who is depicted as a genderless bird and often represented by a golden eagle, is the first creature to inhabit the universe alongside the gods called Bathala (Langit; Sky) and Aman Sinaya (Dagat; Sea). Bathala and Aman Sinaya often conflicted in their rivalry over the earth.

What is southwest monsoon winds?

The southwest monsoon derives its name from winds which blow from a south-westerly direction in the Indian subcontinent. Normally, this high-pressure region starts forming by mid-April and its strength is an important factor which determines the intensity of monsoon in India.

Who did Amihan save?

In the legend Amihan is described as a bird who saves the first human beings, Malakas and Maganda from a bamboo plant. Amihan is also depicted with Habagat which explains the wind patterns in the country. In one legend they are depicted as children of the supreme deity Bathala.

What is the meaning of Amihan mythical bird?

Amihan is a genderless deity that is depicted as a bird in the Philippine mythology. In the legend Amihan is described as a bird who saves the first human beings, Malakas and Maganda from a bamboo plant. Amihan is also depicted with Habagat which explains the wind patterns in the country.


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